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Vectoring Process Using Adobe Illustrator | Week 3 Drawing School Supplies

This week I'm going to take you on the vectoring process using Adobe Illustrator. This is my week 3 drawing school supplies series.

Vectoring Process Using Adobe Illustrator | Week 3 Drawing School Supplies

This week I’m going to take you on the vectoring process using Adobe Illustrator. This is my week 3 drawing school supplies series. If you missed the other videos, click here for week 1 and here for week 2.

As always there are 100 ways to do something. This is simply the process I prefer to use when vectoring. I don’t like Affinity Designer on the iPad. I’ve been using Adobe Illustrator on a Mac for over 20 years. It’s my go-to, most comfortable method for vectoring.

Yes, image trace has its place in vectoring. But nothing beats the good ‘ol pen tool!

Tools I Use in Vectoring

  • iMac 5K Retina Computer
  • Wacom Intuos Pen* (I do have a Cintiq but I put it away as I don’t have room for it right now with filming equipment, too).
  • Adobe Illustrator CC

Watch My Vectoring Process Using Adobe Illustrator

Want a MORE In Depth Illustrator Vectoring and Drawing Process?

Stay tuned! I have plans for a workshop that will go into Illustrator deeper and help you learn the program and the process in a slower way. Plus workshops are great ways to give you more information I could ever give in 10 minutes!

Affiliate Links Disclosure

This post may contain affiliate links noted with an asterisk*, which means that if you click on one of the product links I've included, I’ll receive a small percentage of the sale should you purchase it. But, please do not fret! I don't post links to products that I have not personally tried or felt are worth sharing. In fact, I love these products so much that I have to share them with you. It would be silly not to take advantage of affiliate programs, right?
Holly McCaig

About Holly McCaig

Holly McCaig is a 20 year veteran of the design world. With her mark being made in scrapbooking and photography, Holly now educates eager artists how to do lettering in procreate on the iPad Pro. She resides in Denver, Colorado with her two dogs, Lola and Daisy. Visit Holly: Instagram | Pinterest | Facebook | Shoppe

Holly McCaig is a 20 year veteran of the design world. With her mark being made in scrapbooking and photography, Holly now educates eager artists how to do lettering in procreate on the iPad Pro. She resides in Denver, Colorado with her two dogs, Lola and Daisy.

Visit Holly: Instagram | Pinterest | Facebook | Shoppe

10 Comments

  1. Glenda Watts on September 21, 2018 at 9:54 am

    As always, it’s a pleasure to watch you work! Thanks for the videos!

    • Holly McCaig on September 21, 2018 at 10:05 am

      You’re very welcome, Glenda!!!

  2. Hayley on September 21, 2018 at 3:17 pm

    Looking forward to hearing more about the workshop! I really need to get illustrator, and learn how to use it properly, but I hate the price point. When you pulled the color palette to color your drawing, was that a palette you had already made, or did illustrator pull from the original image? Thanks for sharing your knowledge!

    • Holly McCaig on September 22, 2018 at 1:08 pm

      It’s actually a great price point being it’s a subscription based. I used to have to pay over $600 just for Illustrator and then buy upgrades! Yuck! Those are my own color palette I developed for my brand.

  3. Cynthia Garner on September 25, 2018 at 11:31 am

    i am soooo thankful, for all you have shared… I’d have been an IPAD newbie mess…. LOL I am wondering though, how do we save our vectored images, with their transparent background…. mine always turn pixelly…:( thank you again Holly.

    • Holly McCaig on September 25, 2018 at 11:38 am

      Not sure I follow. If you are saving your vectored file in Illustrator as an .AI file or .EPS file they are always going to be the best resolution for your vendors and print. If you are exporting as a JPG file you would choose the DPI/Resolution output at that process to match your needs. When you export them as .JPG or .PNG files you are converting them back to pixels, and those files can’t be scaled without loss of quality.

  4. Anne Grieve on November 2, 2018 at 11:21 am

    Hi Holly, thanks for posting this video it was really inspirational. If you don’t mind me asking can you please explain why you turned your drawing into a vector by exporting from Procreate into illustrator? Is this something you do only if you are going to use your drawing for a print project? Otherwise do you just create art that you define as ‘sketches’ in Procreate and post on Instagram but don’t take them further? Hope you don’t mind my curiosity.

    • Holly McCaig on November 2, 2018 at 11:49 am

      Because Procreate is pixel based while Illustrator is vector based. Vector means you can scale up without loss of quality. You can’t do that with a pixel-based program like Procreate or Photoshop – you’ll get bitmapped or fuzzy output if you try to scale larger. I vector because my output isn’t pixeled in any way and higher quality for my manufacturers. Many companies like a screen printer, embroidery company or enamel pin manf. want a vector file. I would rather do it myself than have a company like a screen printer or enamel pin manf. interpret my work and vector for me. Then I know it’s MY quality of work.

      • Anne Grieve on November 3, 2018 at 2:44 am

        Thank you so much Holly!

  5. Caroline Jones on November 13, 2018 at 2:03 pm

    I’ve just watched ll 3 videos and appreciate how much work has gone into these! So thank you for sharing your work flow. Personally I use Inkscape (SVG format) to vectorise my work but am in no way as adept at using the Pen Tool as you are! 🙂

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